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Paleontological Journal

, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 84–91 | Cite as

Arkharavia heterocoelica gen. et sp. nov., a new sauropod dinosaur from the Upper Cretaceous of the Far East of Russia

  • V. R. Alifanov
  • Yu. L. Bolotsky
Article

Abstract

A new sauropod dinosaur, Arkharavia heterocoelica gen. et sp. nov., from the Maastrichtian (Udurchukan Formation) of the Amur Region, Russia, is described based on a tooth and several isolated anterior caudal vertebrae. It is distinguished by the saddle-shaped centrum and high neural spine of the anterior caudal vertebrae. Certain structural characters of the new genus are in common with Chubutisaurus insignis (Titanosauriformes) from the Upper Cretaceous of Argentina.

Key words

Sauropoda Dinosauria Upper Cretaceous Maastrichtian Far East Russia 

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Borissiak Paleontological InstituteRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Institute of Geology and Nature Management, Far East BranchRussian Academy of SciencesBlagoveshchenskRussia

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