Microbiology

, Volume 86, Issue 4, pp 533–535 | Cite as

Microorganisms associated with microscopic insects Megaphragma amalphitanum and Scydosella musawasensis

  • A. V. Nedoluzhko
  • V. V. Kadnikov
  • A. V. Beletsky
  • F. S. Sharko
  • S. V. Tsygankova
  • A. V. Mardanov
  • N. V. Ravin
  • K. G. Skryabin
Short Communications

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. V. Nedoluzhko
    • 1
  • V. V. Kadnikov
    • 2
  • A. V. Beletsky
    • 2
  • F. S. Sharko
    • 2
  • S. V. Tsygankova
    • 1
  • A. V. Mardanov
    • 2
  • N. V. Ravin
    • 2
    • 3
  • K. G. Skryabin
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”MoscowRussia
  2. 2.Institute of Bioengineering, Research Center of BiotechnologyRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  3. 3.Biological FacultyLomonosov Moscow State UniversityMoscowRussia

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