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Doklady Chemistry

, Volume 482, Issue 1, pp 204–206 | Cite as

Biocompatibility of the Ti81Nb13Ta3Zr3 Alloy

  • M. A. SevostyanovEmail author
  • A. S. Baikin
  • L. A. Shatova
  • E. O. Nasakina
  • A. V. Berezhnov
  • S. V. Gudkov
  • K. V. Sergienko
  • S. V. Konushkin
  • M. I. Baskakova
  • A. G. Kolmakov
Chemical Technology
  • 15 Downloads

Abstract

Titanium-based alloy with low-toxic metals such as niobium, tantalum and zirconium (TiNbTaZr) was manufactured. The primary weight percentages of elements used for fusion were: titanium, 65%; niobium, 20%, tantalum, 10%; and zirconium, 5%. The TiNbTaZr alloy had a yield strength of about 550 MPa, a tensile strength of about 700 MPa, and a Young’s modulus of about 50 GPa, that is, it was comparable with Nitinol. A primary study of the biocompatibility of the TiNbTaZr alloy using the SH-SY5Y cells showed that the alloy did not have significant short-term toxicicity towards the cells incubated on the alloy surface. The number of non-viable cells was 2.5 times lower on the TiNbTaZr alloy than on Nitinol. The biocompatibility of TiNbTaZr was more pronounced than that of the Nitinol reference sample.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Sevostyanov
    • 1
    Email author
  • A. S. Baikin
    • 1
  • L. A. Shatova
    • 2
  • E. O. Nasakina
    • 1
  • A. V. Berezhnov
    • 3
  • S. V. Gudkov
    • 4
    • 5
    • 6
  • K. V. Sergienko
    • 1
  • S. V. Konushkin
    • 1
  • M. I. Baskakova
    • 1
  • A. G. Kolmakov
    • 1
  1. 1.Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Materials ScienceRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Voronezh State Technical University (VSTU)VoronezhRussia
  3. 3.Institute of Cell BiophysicsRussian Academy of SciencesPushchinoRussia
  4. 4.Prokhorov General Physics InstituteRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  5. 5.Vladmirsky Moscow Regional Research and Clinical Institute (MONIKI)MoscowRussia
  6. 6.All-Russian Research Institute of PhytopathologyRussian Academy of Agricultural SciencesBolshie VyaziomyRussia

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