Physics of Particles and Nuclei Letters

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 50–60 | Cite as

Study of slow and fast extraction for the ultralow energy storage ring (USR)

  • G. A. Karamysheva
  • A. I. Papash
  • C. P. Welsch
Methods of Physical Experiment

Abstract

The Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR, GSI) will not only provide future users with high fluxes of antiprotons in the high-energy range, but it is also intended to include a dedicated program for low-energy antiproton research in the keV regime, realized with the FLAIR project. The deceleration of antiprotons with an initial energy of 30 MeV down to ultralow energies of 20 keV will be realized in two steps. First, the beam is cooled and slowed down to an energy of 300 keV in a conventional magnetic ring, the Low energy Storage Ring (LSR) before being transferred into the electrostatic Ultralow energy Storage Ring (USR). In this synchrotron the deceleration to a final energy of 20 keV will be realized. This paper describes the ion-beam optical and mechanical layout of the beam extraction from the USR and summarizes the expected beam qualities of extracted beams.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. A. Karamysheva
    • 1
  • A. I. Papash
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • C. P. Welsch
    • 4
    • 5
  1. 1.Joint Institute for Nuclear ResearchDubnaRussia
  2. 2.Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear PhysicsHeidelbergGermany
  3. 3.Kiev Institute for Nuclear ResearchNASDaresburyUkraine
  4. 4.University of LiverpoolLiverpoolUK
  5. 5.The Cockcroft Institute for Accelerator Science and TechnologyDaresburyUK

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