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Physics of Particles and Nuclei Letters

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 103–106 | Cite as

Automatic methods of the processing of data from track detectors on the basis of the PAVICOM facility

  • A. B. Aleksandrov
  • L. A. Goncharova
  • D. A. Davydov
  • P. A. Publichenko
  • T. M. Roganova
  • N. G. Polukhina
  • E. L. Feinberg
Techniques of Physical Experiment
  • 18 Downloads

Abstract

New automatic methods essentially simplify and increase the rate of the processing of data from track detectors. This provides a possibility of processing large data arrays and considerably improves their statistical significance. This fact predetermines the development of new experiments which plan to use large-volume targets, large-area emulsion, and solid-state track detectors [1]. In this regard, the problem of training qualified physicists who are capable of operating modern automatic equipment is very important. Annually, about ten Moscow students master the new methods, working at the Lebedev Physical Institute at the PAVICOM facility [2–4]. Most students specializing in high-energy physics are only given an idea of archaic manual methods of the processing of data from track detectors. In 2005, on the basis of the PAVICOM facility and the physicstraining course of Moscow State University, a new training work was prepared. This work is devoted to the determination of the energy of neutrons passing through a nuclear emulsion. It provides the possibility of acquiring basic practical skills of the processing of data from track detectors using automatic equipment and can be included in the educational process of students of any physical faculty. Those who have mastered the methods of automatic data processing in a simple and pictorial example of track detectors will be able to apply their knowledge in various fields of science and technique. Formulation of training works for pregraduate and graduate students is a new additional aspect of application of the PAVICOM facility described earlier in [4].

PACS numbers

29.40.Gx 

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. B. Aleksandrov
    • 1
  • L. A. Goncharova
    • 1
  • D. A. Davydov
    • 2
  • P. A. Publichenko
    • 2
  • T. M. Roganova
    • 2
  • N. G. Polukhina
    • 1
  • E. L. Feinberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Lebedev Physical InstituteRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Skobel’tsyn Institute of Nuclear PhysicsMoscow State UniversityMoscowRussia

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