Geology of Ore Deposits

, Volume 51, Issue 8, pp 827–832 | Cite as

Thermal expansion of new arsenate minerals, bradaczekite, NaCu4(AsO4)3, and urusovite, Cu(AsAlO5)

  • S. K. Filatov
  • D. S. Rybin
  • S. V. Krivovichev
  • L. P. Vergasova
Mineralogical Crystallography

Abstract

Thermal behavior of two new exhalation copper-bearing minerals, bradaczekite and urusovite, from the Great Tolbachik Fissure Eruption (1975–1976, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia) has been studied by X-ray thermal analysis within the range 20–700°C in air. The following major values of the thermal expansion tensor have been calculated for urusovite: α11 = 10, α22 = αb = 7, α33 = 4, αV = 21 × 10−6°C−1, μ = c∧α33 = 49° and bradaczekite: α11aver = 23, α22 = 8, α33aver = 6 × 10−6°C−1, μ(c∧α33) = 73°. The sharp anisotropy of thermal deformations of these minerals, absences of phase transitions, and stability of the minerals in the selected temperature range corresponding to conditions of their formation and alteration during the posteruption period of the volcanic activity are established.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. K. Filatov
    • 1
  • D. S. Rybin
    • 1
  • S. V. Krivovichev
    • 1
  • L. P. Vergasova
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculty of GeologySt. Petersburg State UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.Institute of Volcanology, Far East DivisionRussian Academy of SciencesPetropavlovsk-KamchatskyRussia

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