Geology of Ore Deposits

, Volume 49, Issue 7, pp 518–521 | Cite as

Parageorgbokiite, β-Cu5O2(SeO3)2Cl2, a new mineral species from volcanic exhalations, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

  • L. P. Vergasova
  • S. V. Krivovichev
  • S. K. Filatov
  • S. N. Britvin
  • P. C. Burns
  • V. V. Anan’ev
Article

Abstract

Parageorgbokiite, β-Cu5O2(SeO3)2Cl2, has been found at the second cinder cone of the Great Fissure Tolbachik Eruption, Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. Ralstonite, tolbachite, melanothallite, chalcocyanite, euchlorine, Fe oxides, tenorite, native gold, sophiite, Na, Ca, and Mg sulfates, cotunnite, and some copper oxoselenites are associated minerals. The estimated temperature of the mineral formation is 400–625°C. The color is green, with a vitreous luster; the streak is light green. The mineral is brittle, with the Mohs hardness ranging from 3 to 4. Cleavage is not observed. The calculated density is 4.70 g/cm3. Parageorgbokiite is biaxial (+); α = 2.05(1), β = 2.05(1), and γ = 2.08(1); 2V(meas.) is ∼03, and 2V(calc.) = 0(5)°. The optical orientation is X = a; other details remain unclear. The mineral is pleochroic, from grass green on X and Y to yellowish green on Z. The empirical formula calculated on the basis of O + Cl = 10 is Cu4.91Pb0.02O1.86(ScO3)2Cl2.14. The simplified formula is Cu5O2(ScO3)2Cl2. Parageorgbokiite pertains to a new structural type of inorganic compounds. Its name points out its dimorphism with georgbokiite, which was named in honor of G.B. Bokii, the prominent Russian crystal chemist (1909–2000).

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. P. Vergasova
    • 1
  • S. V. Krivovichev
    • 2
  • S. K. Filatov
    • 2
  • S. N. Britvin
    • 2
  • P. C. Burns
    • 3
  • V. V. Anan’ev
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Volcanology, Far East DivisionRussian Academy of SciencesPetropavlovsk-KamchatskiRussia
  2. 2.Faculty of GeologySt. Petersburg State UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia
  3. 3.Department of Civil Engineering and Geological SciencesUniversity of Notre DameNotre DameUSA

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