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Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics

, Volume 129, Issue 3, pp 375–385 | Cite as

Solar Cosmic Ray Acceleration by a Shock Wave in the Lower Solar Corona on November 22, 1977

  • S. N. TaneevEmail author
  • S. A. StarodubtsevEmail author
  • V. G. Grigor’ev
  • E. G. Berezhko
NUCLEI, PARTICLES, FIELDS, GRAVITATION, AND ASTROPHYSICS
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Abstract

Based on the theory of diffusive shock acceleration of charged particles, we have investigated the spectra of protons recorded in the solar cosmic ray event near the Earth’s orbit on November 22, 1977 (ground level enhancement no. 30, GLE30). The proton flux data from the CPME instrument installed on the IMP-8 spacecraft and the worldwide network of neutron monitors have been used to analyze the event. Using GLE30 as an example, we have shown for the first time that solar cosmic rays of relativistic energies can be produced by a shock wave with a relatively low speed of 560 km s–1 in the lower solar corona at a distance up to 1.6\({{R}_{ \odot }}\) (\({{R}_{ \odot }}\) is the solar radius) within 615 s. The calculated proton spectra satisfactorily reproduce the measurements in the Earth’s orbit.

Notes

FUNDING

This work was supported by the Basic Research Program of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences for 2017–2020: Program II.16.2 “Physics of Cosmic Rays and Solar–Terrestrial Relations,” Project II.16.2.2 “Origin of Cosmic Rays in Various Astrophysical Objects and Dynamics of their Distribution in Interplanetary Space,” registration number NIOKTR AAAA-A17-117021450058-6.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Inc. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of SciencesYakutskRussia

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