Russian Microelectronics

, Volume 41, Issue 3, pp 172–180 | Cite as

Current-voltage characteristic and the spectrum width of electrons tunneling through W-WO2-(Au 147 )-Al2O3-Al and Nd-Nd2O3-(Au 55 )-Nd2O3-Nd nanosandwiches. Part II: Construction and analysis of 1D models for 3D nanosandwiches

Article
  • 33 Downloads

Abstract

This is the second part of the series of two articles devoted to the analysis of electron tunneling through magic nanoclusters of Au55 and Au147. Models of 1D projections of W-WO2-(Au 147 )-Al2O3-Al and Nd-Nd2O3-(Au 55 )-Nd2O3-Nd 3D tunnel nanostructures are constructed with the use of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) levels \(E_{HOMO^ - } \) of the anions of the nanoclusters of Au55 and Au147, and the potentials of Au, W, Al, and Nd atoms calculated in the first part of this study. The levels of the bottom of the potential wells of 1D structures are chosen so that they include resonance energy levels coinciding with the anion level \(E_{HOMO^ - } \) for an appropriate 3D structure (Au 147 or Au 55 ). With regard to the potentials in the structures of a nanocapacitor and the image forces, the current-voltage characteristic (CVC) and the width of the resonance peak in the spectrum of tunneling electrons are calculated as a function of the potential difference across the external electrodes of metal-metal nanodiodes. A scheme of a hypothetical high-frequency nanoscale metal transistor is proposed that is based on a cluster of Au147 that does not produce hot electrons.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Zhukov V.A. and Maslov V.G., Current-Voltage Characteristic and the Spectrum Width of Electrons Tunneling through W-WO2-(Au147)-Al2O3-Al and Nd-Nd2O3-(Au55)-Nd2O3-Nd Nanosandwiches. Part I: Quantum-Chemical Calculation of the Energy of Orbitals of the Anions of Au55 and Au147 Nanoclusters, Mikroelektronika, 2012, vol. 41, no. 2.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Landau, L.D. and Lifshits, E.M., Kvantovaya mekhanika (Quantum Mechanics), Moscow: Fizmatgiz, 1963.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Fizicheskaya entsiklopediya (Physical Encyclopedia), Moscow: Sovetskaya Entsiklopediya, 1990.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
  5. 5.
    Nenakalivaemye katody (Field-Emission Cathodes), Elinson M.E., Ed., Moscow: Sovetskoe Radio, 1974.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Feynman R.P., Leighton R.B., and Sands M., The Feynman Lectures on Physics, London: Addison-Wesley, Publishing Company, Inc., London, 1964.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Terletskii, Ya.P. and Rybakov, Yu.P., Elektrodinamika (Electrodynamics), Moscow: Vysshaya Shkola, 1980.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Imry Y., in Directions in Condensed Matter Physics, Grinstein, G. and Mazenko, G., Eds., Singapore: World Sci., 1986, p. 101.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Tunneling Phenomena in Solids, Burstein, E. and Lundqvist, S., Eds., New York: Plenum, 1969.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Bertein, F., Bases de l’electronique quantique, Eyrolles: Paris, 1969, vol. 2.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Heidenreich, R.D., Fundamentals of Transmission Electron Microscopy, New York: Interscience, 1964.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Washburn, S. and Webb R.A., Aharonov-Bohm Effect in Normal Metal. Quantum Coherence and Transport, Adv. Phys., 1986, vol. 35, no. 4, pp. 375–422.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.St. Petersburg Institute of Information Science and AutomationRussian Academy of SciencesSt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.St. Petersburg State University of Information Technologies, Mechanics, and OpticsSt. PetersburgRussia

Personalised recommendations