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Russian Journal of Genetics

, Volume 48, Issue 4, pp 477–479 | Cite as

Frequencies of functional caspase 12 genotypes in the North-Africa population

  • A. D. Kempińska-Podhorodecka
  • O. M. Knap
  • K. Kobus
  • A. Ciechanowicz
Short Communications

Abstract

Caspase 12 (Csp-12) is a cysteine protease that plays a role in regulation of cytokine maturation. It is present either in a functional full-length variant (Csp-12L) that predisposes to a lower immune response or in an inactive, common version (Csp-12S) that contains a stop codon that results in a truncated form. Genomic DNA from unrelated North Africans, residents of 4th Nile Cataract Region in Sudan, was analyzed. One hundred umbilical blood samples of Polish newborns served as a reference group from the Caucasian population. The analysis of stop-codon polymorphism performed on the 212 human samples from Northern Sudan identified 6.6% individuals with heterozygous genotypes while not one homozygous Csp-12L was found. All examined Polish individuals were homozygous Csp-12S.

Keywords

Yersinia Pestis Umbilical Cord Blood Sample Lower Immune Response Light Chain Enhancer Cytokine Maturation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. D. Kempińska-Podhorodecka
    • 1
  • O. M. Knap
    • 2
  • K. Kobus
    • 1
  • A. Ciechanowicz
    • 3
  1. 1.Medical Biology LaboratoryPomeranian Medical UniversitySzczecinPoland
  2. 2.Independent Laboratory of Disaster MedicinePomeranian Medical UniversitySzczecinPoland
  3. 3.Department of Clinical and Molecular BiochemistryPomeranian Medical UniversitySzczecinPoland

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