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Herald of the Russian Academy of Sciences

, Volume 89, Issue 5, pp 468–477 | Cite as

Geopolitical Meridians of World-Class Universities

  • E. V. BalatskyEmail author
  • N. A. EkimovaEmail author
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Abstract

The results of two waves of identification of world-class universities (for 2017 and 2019) are considered, giving a geopolitical “snapshot” of the market of leading universities of the world. It is shown that United Europe is forging ahead into the lead, while Asia and the United States have worsened their positions. It is economic and cultural factors that underlie success in the formation of global universities. The economic precondition is the presence of global high-tech companies in a country, the number and strength of which determine the number and strength of world-class universities; and the cultural precondition is a wide spread of “the philosophy of collaboration,” which implies intensive sharing of experience between universities both at the domestic level and between countries through numerous forms of collaboration—international leagues and unions, regional consortia and groups, and professional associations and alliances.

Keywords:

world-class universities competitiveness market of leading universities global high-tech companies 

Notes

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Financial University under the Government of the Russian FederationMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Central Economics and Mathematics Institute, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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