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Stratigraphy and Geological Correlation

, Volume 17, Issue 1, pp 79–97 | Cite as

Flora development in Northeastern Asia and Northern Alaska during the Cretaceous-Paleogene transitional epoch

  • A. B. Herman
  • M. A. Akhmetiev
  • T. M. Kodrul
  • M. G. Moiseeva
  • A. I. Iakovleva
Article

Abstract

Study of floral succession from the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary interval in Russian Far East (Zeya-Bureya depression), Northeastern Russia (Koryak Upland), and Northern Alaska (Sagavanirktok River basin) is crucial for better understanding palaeoclimatic and palaeogeographic factors, which controlled events in vegetation evolution at that time. The succession of fossil floras in the Zeya-Bureya depression includes plant assemblages of the Santonian, Campanian, early Danian, Danian, and Danian-Selandian age. The early Danian Boguchan Flora keeps continuity in composition and dominating taxa with the Campanian Late Kundur Flora. The Koryak Flora of the Amaam Lagoon area (Northeastern Russia) is dated as late Maastrichtian based on correlation of plant-bearing beds with marine biostratigraphy, whereas the Early and Late Sagwon floras of Northern Alaska are dated back to the Danian-Selandian and early Paleocene based on palynological and macrofloristic data. The Early Sagwon Flora is most close to the late Maastrichtian Koryak Flora of the Amaam Lagoon area in composition and main dominants, while the Late Sagwon Flora is comparable with the Danian or Danian-(?) Selandian flora from the Upper Tsagayan Subformation of the Amur area. In a florogenic aspect, trans-Beringian plant migrations from northeastern Asia and southern palaeolatitudes of the Far East, which became possible due to Paleocene climate warming in Arctic, have played an important role in forming of the Paleocene floras of Northern Alaska. Floras of the Far East and high latitudes of Asia and North America show no evidence of catastrophic event at the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary. Their development was most probably controlled by climate changes, plant evolution and migration.

Key words

Late Cretaceous Paleocene boundary evolution of flora the Russian Far East Northeastern Russia Northern Alaska 

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. B. Herman
    • 1
  • M. A. Akhmetiev
    • 1
  • T. M. Kodrul
    • 1
  • M. G. Moiseeva
    • 1
  • A. I. Iakovleva
    • 1
  1. 1.Geological InstituteRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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