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Paleontological Journal

, Volume 45, Issue 1, pp 105–111 | Cite as

On quantitative and semiquantitative analysis of the paleozoic-mesozoic nonmarine paleoecosystems

  • G. N. SadovnikovEmail author
Article

Abstract

Quantitative analysis of taphocoenoses allows the recognition of dominants and codominants of the main associations and reconstruction of the taph, i.e., simplified skeletal structure of the lower units of the paleocatena, which is a reconstructed sequence of benthic communities on the slope of a sedimentary basin (Zakharov and Shurygin, 1985; Krassilov, 2003). Only aquatic and riparian associations are connected with the lithological characteristics of the taphocoenosis. The composition of zootaphocoenoses allows the hydrological mode of basins to be determined. The frequency ratio of basin and lowland associations is determined by the watering of the bottom of valleys and depressions. The frequency ratio of lowland and slope associations is determined by the ripeness of valleys. The frequency ratio of herbaceous and arborescent slope associations is determined by the ruggedness of terrain adjacent to the basin.

Keywords

taphocoenosis dominant analysis taph paleocatena basin slope associations 

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Russian State Geological Prospecting University (RSGPU)MoscowRussia

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