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Paleontological Journal

, 42:1167 | Cite as

Cephalopods in the marine ecosystems of the Paleozoic

  • I. S. Barskov
  • M. S. Boiko
  • V. A. Konovalova
  • T. B. Leonova
  • S. V. Nikolaeva
Article

Keywords

Devonian Paleontological Journal Frasnian Body Chamber Serpukhovian 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. S. Barskov
    • 1
  • M. S. Boiko
    • 1
  • V. A. Konovalova
    • 1
  • T. B. Leonova
    • 1
  • S. V. Nikolaeva
    • 1
  1. 1.Paleontological InstituteRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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