Paleontological Journal

, 42:621

The tiny horned dinosaur Gobiceratops minutus gen. et sp. nov. (Bagaceratopidae, Neoceratopsia) from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia

Article

Abstract

A new horned dinosaur, Gobiceratops minutus gen. et sp. nov. (Bagaceratopidae, Neoceratopsia), from the Upper Cretaceous Baruungoyot Formation of the Khermin Tsav locality (southern Mongolia) is described based on a 3.5-cm-long skull. The nasal included in the orbital border suggests relationship between the new taxon and Bagaceratops rozdestvenskyi. It is proposed that, unlike other neoceratopsian families, the family Bagaceratopidae is of Paleoasiatic origin.

Key words

Dinosauria Neoceratopsia Bagaceratopidae Upper Cretaceous Mongolia 

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Paleontological InstituteRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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