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Paleontological Journal

, 40:351 | Cite as

Biotic changes in a eustatic cyclothem: Domodedovo Formation (Moscovian, Carboniferous) of Peski quarries, Moscow Region

  • P. B. Kabanov
  • A. S. Alekseev
  • D. V. Baranova
  • R. V. Gorjunova
  • S. S. Lazarev
  • V. G. Malkov
Article

Abstract

Stacking lithofacies in the Domodedovo Formation of Peski quarries show prominent changes in paleodepth and depositional environment. Distribution in the section of fusulinoids, algae, conodonts, and macrofossils are revealed. Among the latter, brachiopods and bryozoans are discussed in most detail.

Keywords

Paleontological Journal Lithofacies Grainstone Pennsylvanian Oncoids 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. B. Kabanov
    • 1
  • A. S. Alekseev
    • 2
  • D. V. Baranova
    • 1
  • R. V. Gorjunova
    • 1
  • S. S. Lazarev
    • 1
  • V. G. Malkov
    • 1
  1. 1.Paleontological InstituteRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Geological FacultyMoscow State UniversityVorob’evy gory, Moscow, GSP-3Russia

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