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JETP Letters

, Volume 100, Issue 5, pp 336–339 | Cite as

On the superconductivity of graphite interfaces

  • P. Esquinazi
  • T. T. Heikkilä
  • Y. V. Lysogorskiy
  • D. A. Tayurskii
  • G. E. Volovik
Condensed Matter

Abstract

We propose an explanation for the appearance of superconductivity at the interfaces of graphite with Bernal stacking order. A network of line defects with flat bands appears at the interfaces between two slightly twisted graphite structures. Due to the flat band the probability to find high temperature superconductivity at these quasi one-dimensional corridors is strongly enhanced. When the network of superconducting lines is dense it becomes effectively two-dimensional. The model provides an explanation for several reports on the observation of superconductivity up to room temperature in different oriented graphite samples, graphite powders as well as graphite-composite samples published in the past.

Keywords

Soliton JETP Letter Edge Dislocation Twist Angle Highly Orient Pyrolytic Graphite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Inc. 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Esquinazi
    • 1
  • T. T. Heikkilä
    • 2
  • Y. V. Lysogorskiy
    • 3
  • D. A. Tayurskii
    • 3
    • 4
  • G. E. Volovik
    • 5
    • 6
  1. 1.Division of Superconductivity and Magnetism, Institut für Experimentelle Physik IIUniversität LeipzigLeipzigGermany
  2. 2.Department of Physics and Nanoscience CenterUniversity of JyväskyläJyväskyläFinland
  3. 3.Institute of PhysicsKazan Federal UniversityKazanRussia
  4. 4.Centre for Quantum TechnologiesKazan Federal UniversityKazanRussia
  5. 5.Low Temperature LaboratoryAalto UniversityAaltoFinland
  6. 6.Landau Institute for Theoretical PhysicsRussian Academy of SciencesChernogolovka, Moscow regionRussia

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