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Cosmic Research

, Volume 57, Issue 1, pp 61–67 | Cite as

Mission Design Problems for the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Project

  • R. R. Nazirov
  • N. A. EismontEmail author
  • V. A. Aref’yev
  • F. V. Korotkov
  • A. V. Pogodin
  • E. A. Mikhailov
  • P. V. Mzhelsky
  • A. I. Tregubov
  • A. V. Ditrikh
Article
  • 2 Downloads

Abstract

The Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma (SRG) project is intended for surveying the entire sky in the X‑ray band using two telescopes mounted onboard the spacecraft of the same name (SRG). In addition, some specially chosen areas of the sky and some radiation sources are planned to be investigated after the completion of the survey. The spacecraft was planned to be launched in 2018 into the vicinity of solar-terrestrial collinear libration point L2, using the Proton-M launch vehicle with a DM-03 block upper stage. The technology for completely surveying the celestial sphere consists in scanning by rotating the parallel axes of telescopes around the spacecraft axis, which roughly followed the direction to the Sun. The measurement data, stored onboard the spacecraft, would then be transmitted to the ground receiving stations using the mean gain antenna, the axis of which coincided with the spacecraft’s axis of rotation. This imposed some constraints on the mission design. These constraints included the permissible amplitude of the trajectory of spacecraft motion relative to the libration point in the direction orthogonal to the Sun–Earth line. In addition, the consumption of the onboard propellant was allowed only for orbit correction needed for keeping the spacecraft near the libration point. In this connection, a method was developed using the upper stage in order to decrease the mentioned amplitude down to acceptable values, in the conditions of the requirements imposed on the unit. The paper presents an assessment of its effectiveness.

Notes

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Copyright information

© Pleiades Publishing, Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. R. Nazirov
    • 1
  • N. A. Eismont
    • 1
    Email author
  • V. A. Aref’yev
    • 1
  • F. V. Korotkov
    • 1
  • A. V. Pogodin
    • 2
  • E. A. Mikhailov
    • 2
  • P. V. Mzhelsky
    • 2
  • A. I. Tregubov
    • 3
  • A. V. Ditrikh
    • 3
  1. 1.Space Research Institute, Russian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Lavochkin Scientific and Production AssociationKhimkiRussia
  3. 3.Rocket and Space Corporation EnergiyaKorolevRussia

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