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Physics of Atomic Nuclei

, Volume 66, Issue 6, pp 1146–1151 | Cite as

Perspective for the determination of chemical properties of element 112

  • R. Eichler
  • S. Soverna
Article

Abstrac

We present here results of thermochromatographic model studies with Rn and Hg, conducted in order to prepare future gas-adsorption chromatographic investigations of element 112. The adsorption properties of Rn on various transition metals were investigated by vacuum thermochromatography. From the results of these experiments, predictions have been deduced for the adsorption behavior of hypothetically noble-gas-like elements 112 and 114. Empirical predictions of the adsorption interaction of a noble metallic element 112 and its lighter homologues with transition metal surfaces are given in the literature. The results of these calculations are compared with experimental data obtained in thermochromatographic model experiments with Hg. The most efficient way to chemically identify element 112 is the use of a cryo-on-line detector (COLD)-like setup, which was already successfully applied in the chemical investigation of hassium. Modifications of this device needed for the on-line thermochromatographic investigation of element 112 are presented together with results of test experiments with short-lived isotopes of Rn and Hg.

Keywords

Experimental Data Elementary Particle Model Experiment Chemical Property Metal Surface 
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Copyright information

© MAIK "Nauka/Interperiodica" 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Eichler
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Soverna
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Paul Scherrer InstituteVilligenSwitzerland
  2. 2.University of BernSwitzerland

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