Distributional Preference in Japan

Abstract

Using experiments developed by Engelmann and Strobel (2004), this study investigates distributional preference in Japan. We find that just over half the people in the study have a maximin preference, approximately 7 to 19% have an efficiency preference, approximately 8% have a self-interest preference, and approximately 18% chose the allocation that would reduce the payoff to the rich and the poor, given that her/his payoff would remain constant. The last preference could be interpreted as what is referred to as “malice”, “deep envy” or a “feeling of vulnerability” in behavioural economics and cross-cultural psychology.

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Correspondence to Keigo Kameda.

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Kameda, K., Sato, M. Distributional Preference in Japan. JER 68, 394–408 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1111/jere.12112

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JEL Classification Numbers

  • D31
  • D63
  • H61