Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 20, Issue 5, pp 444–447

Brief report: If you build it, they will come

Methods for recruiting latinos into cancer research
  • Vanessa B. Sheppard
  • Lisa Sanderson Cox
  • Mariano J. Kanamori
  • Janet Cañar
  • Yosselyn Rodríguez
  • Michelle Goodman
  • Jyl Pomeroy
  • Jeanne Mandelblatt
  • Elmer E. Huerta
  • Latin American Cancer Research Coalition (LACRC)
Populations At Risk

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Latinos have low representation in cancer prevention trials and intervention studies. Culturally appropriate recruitment strategies are needed to address this issue.

OBJECTIVE: To describe and summarize the effectiveness of recruitment strategies used by the Latin American Cancer Research Coalition (LACRC).

DESIGN: Descriptive report of recruitment methods.

PARTICIPANTS: Uninsured Latino immigrants (N=1,170; 77% female, 23% male) from Central and South America recruited to 7 cancer control studies.

APPROACH: The LACRC recruitment model involved inclusion of Latino researchers and providers, and use of culturally acceptable materials released through culturally appropriate outlets such as Latino radio stations.

RESULTS: The overall participation rate was high—96% of patients identified as eligible agreed to participate. Women were excellent referrals for recruiting men to research studies. Additionally, a local Latino radio program was used to efficiently recruit eligible study participants.

CONCLUSIONS: Latinos are interested and willing to participate in cancer control studies when culturally relevant approaches are used. Research teams that partner with Latino researchers and with Latino service providers are important in educating Latinos about cancer control and encouraging participation in research.

Key words

minorities clinical trials recruitment Latinos 

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vanessa B. Sheppard
    • 1
  • Lisa Sanderson Cox
    • 1
  • Mariano J. Kanamori
    • 1
  • Janet Cañar
  • Yosselyn Rodríguez
    • 2
  • Michelle Goodman
    • 1
  • Jyl Pomeroy
  • Jeanne Mandelblatt
    • 1
  • Elmer E. Huerta
    • 2
  • Latin American Cancer Research Coalition (LACRC)
  1. 1.Cancer Control Program, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer CenterGeorgetown University Medical CenterWashington, DCUSA
  2. 2.Washington Cancer Institute at Washington Hospital CenterWashington, DCUSA

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