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Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 19, Issue 5, pp 501–504 | Cite as

Toward an informal curriculum that teaches professionalism

Transforming the social environment of a medical school
  • Anthony L. Suchman
  • Penelope R. Williamson
  • Debra K. Litzelman
  • Richard M. Frankel
  • David L. Mossbarger
  • Thomas S. Inui
  • the Relationship-centered Care Initiative Discovery Team
Innovations In Education And Clinical Practice

Abstract

The social environment or “informal” curriculum of a medical school profoundly influences students’ values and professional identities. The Indiana University School of Medicine is seeking to foster a social environment that consistently embodies and reinforces the values of its formal competency-based curriculum. Using an appreciative narrative-based approach, we have been encouraging students, residents, and faculty to be more mindful of relationship dynamics throughout the school. As participants discover how much relational capacity already exists and how widespread is the desire for a more collaborative environment, their perceptions of the school seem to shift, evoking behavior change and hopeful expectations for the future.

Key words

medical education professionalism curriculum competencies relationship-centered care 

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Copyright information

© Society of General Internal Medicine 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony L. Suchman
    • 4
    • 6
  • Penelope R. Williamson
    • 5
    • 6
  • Debra K. Litzelman
    • 2
  • Richard M. Frankel
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • David L. Mossbarger
    • 1
  • Thomas S. Inui
    • 1
    • 2
  • the Relationship-centered Care Initiative Discovery Team
  1. 1.the Regenstrief Institute for Health CareIndianapolis
  2. 2.the Indiana University School of MedicineIndianapolis
  3. 3.the Richard L. Roudebush VAMCIndianapolis
  4. 4.the University of Rochester School of Medicine and DentistryRochester
  5. 5.the Johns Hopkins University School of MedicineBaltimore
  6. 6.Relationship Centered Health CareRochester

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