Advertisement

Journal of General Internal Medicine

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 157–162 | Cite as

Measuring satisfaction with mammography results reporting

  • Nancy C. DolanEmail author
  • Joe Feinglass
  • Aparna Priyanath
  • Corrine Haviley
  • Asta V. Sorensen
  • Luz A. Venta
Original Articles

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To assess factors associated with patient satisfaction with communication of mammography results and their understanding and ability to recall these results.

DESIGN: Cross-sectional telephone survey.

SETTING: Academic breast imaging center.

PATIENTS: Two hundred ninety-eight patients who had either a screening or diagnostic mammogram.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Survey items assessed waiting time for results, anxiety about results, satisfaction with several components of results reporting, and patients’ understanding of results and recommendations. Women undergoing screening exams were more likely to be dissatisfied with the way the results were communicated than those who underwent diagnostic exams and received immediate results (20% vs 11%, P=.05). For these screening patients, waiting for more than two weeks for notification of results, difficulty getting in touch with someone to answer questions, low ratings of how clearly results were explained, and considerable or extreme anxiety about the results were all independently associated with dissatisfaction with the way the results were reported, while age and actual exam result were not.

CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing screening mammograms were more likely to be dissatisfied with the way the results were communicated than were those who underwent diagnostic mammograms. Interventions to reduce the wait time for results, reduce patients’ anxiety, and improve the clarity with which the results and recommendations are given may help improve overall satisfaction with mammography result reporting.

Key words

mammography satisfaction doctor-patient communication test results 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Cockburn J, Hill D, De Luise T, et al. Satisfaction of attenders during the establishment of an Australian mammography screening program. Aust J Public Health. 1993;17:103–8.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Lerman C, Rimer B, Trock B. Factors associated with repeat adherence to breast cancer screeing. Prev Med. 1990;19:279–90.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Loeken K, Steine S, Sandvik L. A new instrument to measure patient satisfaction with mammography, Validity, reliability, and discriminatory power. Med Care. 1997;35:731–41.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Quality Mammography Standards; Final Rule. Federal Register, Volume 62, p. 55852–994, October 28, 1997.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    D’Orsi CJ, Basset LW, Feig SA, et al. Breast imaging reporting data systems (BI-RADS). 3rd ed. Reston, Va: American College of Radiology; 1998.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Cockburn J, Hill D, Irwig L, et al. Development and validation of an instrument to measure satisfaction of participants at breast screening programes. Eur J Cancer. 1991;27:287–31.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Bakker DA, Lightfoot NE, Steggles S, et al. The experience and satisfaction of women attending breast cancer screening. Oncol Nurs Forum. 1998;25:115–21.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Farria DM, Fox SA, Ganz P, et al. Women’s communication preferences and experiences in mammography. Radiology. 1998;209:392.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Blackwell Science Inc 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy C. Dolan
    • 1
    Email author
  • Joe Feinglass
    • 2
  • Aparna Priyanath
    • 1
  • Corrine Haviley
    • 4
  • Asta V. Sorensen
    • 1
  • Luz A. Venta
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of General Internal MedicineNorthwestern University Medical SchoolChicago
  2. 2.Institute for Health Services Research and Policy StudiesNorthwestern University Medical SchoolUSA
  3. 3.Section of Breast Imaging, Department of RadiologyNorthwestern University Medical SchoolUSA
  4. 4.Breast Health Program, Lynn Sage Comprehensive Breast CenterNorthwestern Memorial HospitalUSA

Personalised recommendations