Anatomical Science International

, Volume 83, Issue 4, pp 280–282 | Cite as

Peroneotalocalcaneous muscle

  • R. Shane Tubbs
  • William R. May
  • Mohammadali M. Shoja
  • Marios Loukas
  • E. George Salter
  • W. Jerry Oakes
Case Report

Abstract

Variations within the musculature of the lateral compartment of the leg are uncommon. However, clinicians and radiologists should be aware of anatomical alterations in this region when involved in diagnosis or imaging interpretation. The present report describes a well-developed muscle of the lateral compartment of the leg that inserted distally onto the talus and calcaneus. This muscle could be considered a variation of the so-called peroneus quartus muscle. To the authors’ knowledge this muscle variation has not been described as having an attachment onto the talus thus the term ‘peroneotalocalcaneus muscle’ is proposed.

Key words

leg lower extremity muscular variation 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bergman RA, Afifi AK, Miyauchi R (2006a) Peroneus brevis and longus. http://www.anatomyatlases.org/AnatomicVariants/ MuscularSystem/Text/P/17Peroneus.sht.Google Scholar
  2. Bergman RA, Afifi AK, Miyauchi R (2006b) Peroneus quartus (otto). http://www.anatomyatlases.org/AnatomicVariants/ MuscularSystem/Text/P/21Peroneus.sht.Google Scholar
  3. Cheung YY, Rosenburg ZS, Ramsinghani R, Beltran J, Jahss MH (1997) Peroneus quartus muscle: MR imaging features. Radiology 202, 745–50.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Gruber W (1884) Ein neuer Musculus peroneo-calcaneus externus anterior. Arch Path Anat Physiol Klin Med 95, 177–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Macalister A (1875) Additional observations on muscular anomalies in human anatomy (third series), with a catalogue of the principal muscular variations hitherto published. Trans Roy Irish Acad 25, 1–134.Google Scholar
  6. Mick CA, Lynch F (1987) Reconstruction of the peroneal retinaculum using peroneus quartus: A case report. J Bone Joint Surg Am 69, 296–7.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Mori M (1964) Statistics on the musculature of the Japanese. Okajimas Fol Anat Jap 40, 195–300.Google Scholar
  8. Perkins JD (1914) An anomalous muscle of the leg: Peronaeocalcaneus internus. Anat Rec 8, 21–5.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Sobel M, Levy ME, Bohne WH (1990) Congenital variations of the peroneus quartus muscle: An anatomic study. Foot Ankle 11, 81–9.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Wood J (1866) Variations in human myology observed during the winter session of 1867–1868 at King’s College. London Proc R Soc Lond B 17, 483–525.Google Scholar
  11. Zammit J, Singh D (2003) The peroneus quartus muscle: Anatomy and clinical relevance. J Bone Joint Surg Br 85, 1134–7.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Japanese Association of Anatomists 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Shane Tubbs
    • 1
    • 6
  • William R. May
    • 2
  • Mohammadali M. Shoja
    • 3
  • Marios Loukas
    • 4
    • 5
  • E. George Salter
    • 1
  • W. Jerry Oakes
    • 6
  1. 1.Department of Cell BiologyUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamBirminghamUSA
  2. 2.University of Alabama at Birmingham School of MedicineBirminghamUSA
  3. 3.Department of Anatomy and NeurosurgeryTabriz UniversityTabrizIran
  4. 4.Department of Anatomical SciencesSt. George’s UniversityGrenada
  5. 5.Department of Education and DevelopmentHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  6. 6.Section of Pediatric NeurosurgeryUniversity of Alabama at BirminghamAlabama
  7. 7.Pediatric NeurosurgeryChildren’s HospitalBirminghamUSA

Personalised recommendations