Journal of Urban Health

, Volume 78, Issue 2, pp 359–366 | Cite as

The control of mosquito-borne diseases in New York City

Special Feature: West Nile Virus: Public Health Issues Raised by an Emerging Illness

Abstract

Mosquito control began in New York City in 1901. Large-scale efforts to drain marshlands occurred through the 1930s, and aerial application of pesticide occurred as early as 1956. Components of early mosquito-borne disease control were reimplemented in 1999–2000 in response to an outbreak of West Nile virus, and included promoting public and health professional awareness regarding disease causation and prevention, providing free government laboratory testing, case reporting, mapping of mosquito breeding sites and their elimination or application of larvicide to them, and adult mosquito control. Because a potential for various mosquito-borne diseases in New York City persists, continued efforts are warranted to limit mosquito breeding, to monitor adult mosquito populations for the presence of human pathogens, and to establish protocols and capacity for adult mosquito control.

Keywords

Malaria Mosquito Control New York City West Nile Virus 

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Copyright information

© The New York Academy of Medicine 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Arthropod-Borne Disease Surveillance and ControlNew York City Department of HealthNew York

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