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Transcending the Age of Stupid: Learning to Imagine Ourselves Differently

Abstract

Education has an important role in helping young people understand the sociopolitical and technological roots of our current environmental unsustainability problem. However, instrumental analysis is not sufficient; an informed activist orientation is required. Scientific and technological education that ignores issues of justice, equity, and economic power that underpin unsustainability is at odds with the common good. This article argues that educators need to redouble their efforts with young people in ongoing educational acts of disclosing and defiance with respect to the political ecologies supporting the status quo.

Résumé

L’enseignement joue un rôle important lorsqu’il s’agit d’aider les jeunes à mieux comprendre les racines sociopolitiques et technologiques des problèmes d’environnement non durable qui caractérisent le monde actuel. Cependant, une analyse instrumentale n’est pas suffisante, et une orientation activiste bien fondée est nécessaire. Un enseignement scientifique et technologique qui ne tienne pas compte de la justice, de l’équité et des pouvoirs économiques qui sont à la base de la non-durabilité est en contraste avec le bien commun. Cet article soutient que les enseignants doivent redoubler leurs efforts auprès des jeunes, par le biais d’actes pédagogiques continus visant à exposer et à défier les politiques environnementales qui supportent le statu quo.

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Correspondence to Leo Elshof.

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Elshof, L. Transcending the Age of Stupid: Learning to Imagine Ourselves Differently. Can J Sci Math Techn 10, 232–243 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1080/14926156.2010.504483

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