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Science Education as a Call to Action

Abstract

This article takes the view that both science, technology, society, environment (STSE) education and conventional forms of socio-scientific issues (SSI)-oriented science education are inadequate to meet the needs and interests of students faced with the demands, issues, and problems of contemporary life. A much more politicized approach is advocated, with major emphasis on social critique, values clarification, and sociopolitical action.

Résumé

Le point de vue de cet article est que ni l’enseignement des sciences, technologies et société, ni les formes traditionnelles d’enseignement des sciences orientées sur les questions socioscientifiques, ne sont en mesure de satisfaire aux besoins et intérêts d’étudiants qui sont aux prises avec les exigences et les problèmes de la vie contemporaine. Une approche beaucoup plus politisée est préconisée, mettant l’accent sur la critique sociale, la clarification des valeurs et l’action sociopolitique.

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Correspondence to Derek Hodson.

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Hodson, D. Science Education as a Call to Action. Can J Sci Math Techn 10, 197–206 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1080/14926156.2010.504478

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