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Corporatization of higher education through internationalization: the emergence of pathway colleges in Canada

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Abstract

Through increased international student tuition revenue, internationalization provides public Canadian higher education institutions opportunities to offset the effects of stagnant provincial operating grants or earmarked governmental allocations. Pathway colleges, institutions that are either operated by host institutions or as private corporations, offer international students alternative routes to bachelor’s degrees, pathways that are intended for students who do not meet the entrance criteria of Canada’s public sector universities. While beneficial for some students, our analysis shows that pathway colleges tilt the public university towards an academic model that eschews collegial governance structures, privileges a consumerist vision of education, and relies on contract and precarious academic labor.We presenta typology of pathway colleges, providing examples of this trend across Canada. Our study examines the potential increase of human vulnerability that these colleges both produce and rely upon for staff and student recruitment.

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McCartney, D.M., Metcalfe, A.S. Corporatization of higher education through internationalization: the emergence of pathway colleges in Canada. Tert Educ Manag 24, 206–220 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1080/13583883.2018.1439997

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