Journal of Child & Adolescent Trauma

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 8–21 | Cite as

Child Sexual Abuse: Demography, Impact, and Interventions

Interpersonal Traumatic Events

Abstract

Because child sexual abuse (CSA) includes experiences from noncontact abuse to violent rape, the impact on victims varies greatly. Rape has the highest rates of posttraumatic stress disorder of any trauma. Depression and anxiety are associated with CSA, whereas sexualized behaviors, victim stigmatization, and shame are specific to it. The demography of CSA differs from other forms of child maltreatment by gender and social class, so that the risk factors for occurrence and prevention also differ. Evidence-based interventions for many kinds of childhood trauma and maltreatment were first established by CSA clinicians and researchers. Although well-established treatments for child and adult CSA victims now exist, evidence-based interventions are still needed for older adolescent CSA victims, especially those with polyvictimization histories.

Keywords

child sexual abuse CSA demography CSA impact CSA investigation CSA treatment CSA prevention 

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© Taylor & Francis Group, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical CenterUniversity of Cincinnati College of MedicineUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry ML 0539University of Cincinnati College of MedicineCincinnatiUSA

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