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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 408–421 | Cite as

‘Freedom of the seas’: Woodrow Wilson and natural resources

  • Ashley DodsworthEmail author
Themed Section: Wilsonianism and Transatlantic Relation Introduction

Abstract

‘Probably no American of the twentieth century has received more scholarly attention than Woodrow Wilson’ [L.E. Gelfand ‘When Ideals Confront Self-Interest: Wilsonian Foreign Policy’, Diplomatic History 18, no. 1 (1994): 125–34, 125] yet this scholarly attention has yet to consider the role that natural resources played in Wilson’s understanding of the world, or to examine how his understanding of concepts that were central to his political writing and decisions, such as self-determination, were tied to access to natural resources. This article will fill this gap and sketch out how both Wilson and ‘Wilsonianism’ consider natural resources and the implications of this.

Keywords

Woodrow Wilson natural resources freedom of the seas 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.SPAISUniversity of BristolBristolUK

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