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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 16, Issue 2, pp 165–180 | Cite as

Similar impressions? Anglo-American relations and South Asia, autumn 1971

  • Dave RileyEmail author
Article

Abstract

Despite divergences of policy over South Asia in autumn 1971, Heath and Nixon’s communications focused upon areas of agreement. An unwillingness to confront disagreements over policy subsequently fostered misunderstandings between the two allies as both lent tacit support to opposite sides of a hot war in South Asia just weeks later. Nonetheless, Heath’s desire to improve the tone of Anglo-American relations in the autumn of 1971 provides a further challenge to the commonly held assertion that his desire to enter the EC led him to shun an amiable relations with the US.

Keywords

Anglo-American relations Heath Nixon Indira Gandhi Kissinger 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    This ‘established view’ refers broadly to works written prior to the opening of the archives and includes but is not limited to Ritchie Ovendale, Anglo-American Relations in the Twentieth Century (London: Macmillan, 1998)Google Scholar
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    Edward Heath, Old World, New Horizons: Britain, the Common Market, and the Atlantic Alliance (London: Oxford University Press, 1970), 8–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Telegram from Home to Cromer 11/11/71 UKNA FCO 82/65.Google Scholar
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    Record of Meeting between Heath and Gandhi 31/10/71 UKNA PREM 15/568.Google Scholar
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    Telegram from US Embassy Islamabad to State Department 2/11/71 USNA RG 59 Box 2363 POL IND-PAK.Google Scholar
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    Memorandum for the President’s file, Record of Meeting between Nixon and Gandhi 4/11/ 71 FRUS Vol XI South Asia Doc. 179.Google Scholar
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    Memorandum for the President’s file 4/11/71 FRUS Vol XI South Asia Doc. 179.Google Scholar
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    Record of Conversation between Nixon, Kissinger and Haldeman 5/11/71 FRUS 1969–76 Vol E7 Doc. 150.Google Scholar
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    Letter from Heath to Nixon 5/11/71 UKNA PREM 15/569.Google Scholar
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    Minutes of National Security Council Meeting 6/12/71 FRUS Vol XI Doc 237.Google Scholar
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  100. 84.
    Letter from Heath to Nixon 12/12/71 UKNA PREM 15/570.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Law and PoliticsCardiff UniversityCardiffUK

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