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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 326–339 | Cite as

Science, democracy, and peace: Churchill on society and statesmanship, in the Fulton Address and beyond

  • Marjorie JeffreyEmail author
Article

Abstract

The observations and proposals made by Churchill in the Fulton Address rested on his understanding of two forces shaping politics in the twentieth century — science and democracy — and their effect on the need for and possibility of statesmanship. Neither of these two forces had effects that were simple or unreservedly beneficial. Only through wise rule could these forces achieve desirable effects and be safeguarded from their pernicious potential. In Fulton, Churchill was reiterating and applying to new circumstances concerns that he had voiced many times before; the speech can therefore be seen as more than an immediate response to the events of the day.

Keywords

Winston Churchill Fulton Address statesmanship science democracy 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Political ScienceBaylor UniversityWacoUSA

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