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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 14, Issue 3, pp 252–271 | Cite as

Unrequited interdependence? The Anglo-American collision over the supply of missiles to Israel, 1960–1962

  • Vladimir P. RumyantsevEmail author
Article

Abstract

On 9 August 1962, the US unilaterally decided to sell Hawk ground-to-air missiles to Israel despite the preliminary agreement between Washington and London not to supply guided missiles to the Middle Eastern countries. This ignoring of British interests provoked a clash between Washington and London and the furious reaction of Harold Macmillan, who wrote probably most angry message in the history of Anglo-American relations. This article explores this clash as a significant component of the crisis of Anglo-American interdependence that influenced both the strategic partnership between the two Western powers and their relationship in the Middle East, where interdependence frequently became a myth.

Keywords

Anglo-American relationship US Britain Anglo-American interdependence guided missiles 

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Notes

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Contemporary History and International RelationsTomsk State UniversityTomskRussia

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