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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 14, Issue 1, pp 65–82 | Cite as

The origins and limitations of the Atlantic Charter: Britain, the USA, Venezuela, and the development of free trade, 1933–1944

  • Mark SeddonEmail author
Article

Abstract

In response to the Great Depression and the Second World War, the US government worked to propagate free trade throughout the Americas as a means of stimulating domestic economic growth and fostering hemispheric solidary. By 1941, Washington aimed to extend this free trade programme and, therefore, the Anglo-US Atlantic Charter contained a limited commitment to free trade as part of its outline for a new post-war order. However, in 1944, the Venezuelan government demonstrated that it was possible to challenge Anglo-US efforts to apply the Charter to the international oil industry. By analysing the development of the Atlantic Charter’s free trade provision, this article develops our understanding of the origins of the international post-war settlement and its contested nature.

Keywords

Anglo-US relations Atlantic Charter free trade oil Venezuela 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Department of HistoryUniversity of Sheffield, Jessop WestSheffieldUK

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