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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 13, Issue 2, pp 175–203 | Cite as

Making of an Ally — NATO membership conditionality implemented on Croatia

  • Pjer ŠimunovićEmail author
Article

Abstract

The study examines the convergence of critical factors of Croatia’s accession to NATO, revolving around policies of membership conditionality. Against the background of an overarching conditionality of NATO’s entire post-Cold War enlargement, which was making Croatia’s accession possible, it will look deeper — matching the defining traits of the accession process with the tenets of the main international relations theories — into Croatia’s own dynamics, conditioned by an application of the policies of NATO membership conditionality as to Croatia, to present a process decisively governed by a set of distinct parameters, composed of a specific geopolitical, sub-regional backdrop of relationship between NATO and Croatia, of the legacy of war of the 1990s, political, societal, economic and defence reforms, as well as of the criteria associated with the public support for membership.

Keywords

Croatia NATO enlargement membership conditionality post-Communist and post-war transition international relations and security 

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Notes

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© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs of the Republic of CroatiaZagrebCroatia

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