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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 76–95 | Cite as

The Ford Foundation’s role in promoting German-American elite networking during the Cold War

  • Anne ZetscheEmail author
Article

Abstract

The Cold War activities of the Ford Foundation have been subject to many inquiries. However, its prominent role in the promotion of German-American elite networking — as reflected in its relationship with the American Council on Germany (ACG) and the Atlantik-Brücke — has largely been neglected. This article takes a first step in closing this gap by analysing the triangular relationship of the Ford Foundation with these organisations. The article views the Ford Foundation and its grant-recipients ACG and the Atlantik-Brücke as drivers of an evolving transatlantic elite network comprised of private citizens and public figures; a structure that can be conceptualised as state-private network.

Keywords

German-American elite networking Cold War Ford Foundation American Council on Germany Atlantik-Brücke 

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Notes

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© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of HumanitiesNorthumbria UniversityNewcastle upon TyneUK

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