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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 20–39 | Cite as

Saving Bosnia on Capitol Hill: the case of Senator Bob Dole

  • Hamza KarčićEmail author
Article

Abstract

The aim of this article is to analyse the role played by former US Senator Bob Dole in the formulation of American foreign policy towards Bosnia from 1992 to 1995. While the existing literature on US policy during the war in Bosnia almost exclusively focuses on the Clinton administration, this article argues that the administration was reacting to pressure from Senator Dole and other congressional Bosnia hawks. The article will provide a narrative of Senator Dole’s activism and contend that he was consistently the most active senator on the issue of Bosnia; and it will show that congressional pressure prodded the Clinton administration into taking a more forceful policy aimed at ending the Bosnian war.

Keywords

Bob Dole Senate Congress Bosnia war in Bosnia Yugoslavia 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Political ScienceUniversity of SarajevoSarajevoBosnia and Herzegovina

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