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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 237–257 | Cite as

Europe in American World History textbooks

  • Martin Alm
Article

Abstract

The topic of this article is conceptions of the history of Europe in the US World History textbooks from 1921 to 2001. It finds the main theme of this history to be the development of modern democracy and science in Western Europe. The USA features as a forerunner and model of democratisation. Compared to the USA, Europe is held up as both same and different, depending on point in time. More recently, much more space is devoted to non-European history; still where Europe is concerned, the basic historical narrative has remained stable over time. This indicates that the image of Europe has long been fixed in this part of American historical culture.

Keywords

America and Europe European history history textbooks historical culture images 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Martin Alm
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Culture and SocietyAarhus UniversityAarhusDenmark

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