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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 18–40 | Cite as

Formulating a policy towards Eastern Europe on the eve of Détente: The USA, the Allies and Bridge Building, 1961–1964

  • Sotiris RizasEmail author
Article

Abstract

This article attempts to reconstruct the formulation of US policy towards Eastern Europe on the eve of détente drawing from archival material not available or not utilised by earlier contributions. The central argument of this paper is that the USA, as détente progressed, were finally able to formulate, along with their allies, a policy of expanded contacts with Soviet Union’s East European satellites and that this policy of ‘bridge building’ could not, but in the most indirect manner, question the post-war division of Europe. Moreover, this policy did not consider Moscow’s allies autonomously but subjected the issue of Eastern Europe to the German question.

Keywords

Bridge Building Eastern Europe détente German question 

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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Modern Greek History Research CentreAcademy of AthensAthensGreece

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