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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 1–17 | Cite as

The special relationship and the 1945 Anglo-American Loan

  • Philip GannonEmail author
Article

Abstract

The post Second World War economic relationship between Britain and America has been an aspect of the relationship that has been heavily examined by scholars for decades. This paper seeks to contribute to this body of work by providing an investigation into the 1945 Anglo-American Loan and the factors surrounding its implementation. From Victory in Japan (VJ) day through to President Truman signing the final Loan agreement into law in 1946, this episode of Anglo-American economic affairs demonstrates the conditional nature of the relationship. This article explores this episode through investigating the negotiations of the Loan before looking at the role that US public opinion played in affecting the acceptance of the Loan and demonstrates how deep the sentiments of the special relationship ran in the USA after 1945.

Keywords

special relationship Anglo-American Loan post-war economy John Maynard Keynes US public opinion 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Government and International AffairsThe University of DurhamDurhamUK

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