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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 257–267 | Cite as

Mitterrand, France, and NATO: the European transition

  • Charles CoganEmail author
Article

Abstract

With the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation (NATO), Mitterrand on the one hand perpetuated the Gaullist tradition of independence in defence as a gauge of national sovereignty. On the other hand, he inherited the Gaullist tradition with regard to NATO, especially in the matter of a European defence identity apart from NATO. Although fiercely protective of France’s position outside NATO’s integrated command, Mitterrand’s official acceptance of the New Strategic Concept of NATO in 1991 and his participation in the Gulf War and other Western actions were such that arguably they helped pave the way for France’s eventual rapprochement with NATO.

Keywords

France NATO François Mitterrand Bosnian War Gulf War 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Harvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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