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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 9, Issue 2, pp 151–171 | Cite as

Eurabian nightmares: American conservative discourses and the Islamisation of Europe

  • Bruce PilbeamEmail author
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to examine a theme that has become highly prominent in American conservative discourses of recent years, the supposed Islamisation of Europe. In doing so, the article contends that writers propounding the notion of European Islamisation typically misrepresent and misinterpret statistics and trends. Equally, their characterisations of European Muslims, as strongly under the sway of radical Islamist beliefs, are frequently simplistic and misleading. Furthermore, it is shown that conservatives’ interest in this topic arises from more than just a concern for the future of Europe. Instead, many conservatives use this issue to present a particular construction of the ‘European model’ of politics and society, as a means of reasserting long-standing warnings about the dangers of everything from multiculturalism to an expansive welfare state.

Key words

9/11 conservatism demography Europe Islamisation 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.London Metropolitan UniversityUK

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