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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 93–117 | Cite as

Washington’s ‘silent ally’ in World War II? United States policy towards Spain, 1939–1945

  • Andrew N. BuchananEmail author
Article

Abstract

This article examines an important aspect of wartime American policy that, although the subject of heated contemporary debate, has received little scholarly attention. It traces shifts in Washington’s Spanish policy from a protracted period of appeasement lasting well into 1943, to a course marked by strident verbal opposition to the Franco government. In both phases—sometimes described as ‘realist’ and ‘idealist’—American policy was in fact guided by pragmatic concerns and driven by a mixture of short-term military necessity and by the long-term advance of American influence. Based on an examination of the contemporary domestic debate on Spanish policy, the article also explores the relationship between government policy and the public discourse within which it was framed.

Key words

American diplomacy in World War II American policy towards Spain The United States and Franco’s Spain Franklin D. Roosevelt and Spain Carlton Hayes 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Board of Transatlantic Studies 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Vermont and Rutgers UniversityUSA

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