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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 6, Issue 1, pp 22–33 | Cite as

The North Atlantic Triangle and the blockade, 1914–1915

  • Greg Kennedy
Article

Abstract

The British blockade of Germany, and its effects on neutral shipping, was a major issue in Anglo-American relations during the early part of the First World War. From the British point of view it was an obvious necessity to prevent supplies from the USA reaching Germany whereas from the US Government’s perspective this strategy infringed American rights and the principle of the freedom of the seas. As tensions grew over this issue in the early months of the war Canada played an important role in ameliorating the effects of the British blockade on American shipping and thereby underlined the growing significance of the ‘North Atlantic Triangle’ in Anglo-American relations.

Keywords

blockade Canada naval power trade North Atlantic Triangle 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    I would like to thank the Canadian High Commission in London for awarding me a Faculty Research Program Award for doing research on this topic in Canada; the British Academy for a Small Grant during my sabbatical in 2002 which enabled me to do much of the British research; and to funding provided through the Academic Research Program of the Royal Military College of Canada.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Taylor & Francis 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Greg Kennedy
    • 1
  1. 1.Defence Studies DepartmentKing’s College LondonUK

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