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Journal of Transatlantic Studies

, Volume 1, Issue 2, pp 131–151 | Cite as

Harold Wilson, Lyndon Johnson and Anglo-American ‘Summit Diplomacy’, 1964–68

  • Jonathan Colman
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Notes

  1. 1.
    David Bruce Oral History interview conducted by Thomas H. Baker, 9 December 197], Lyndon B. Johnson Library, Austin, Texas (LBJL), part I, p. 11 (it should be noted that a prime minister is head of government rather than head of state). Recent biographies of Wilson include Austen Morgan, Harold Wilson, London: Pluto, 1992Google Scholar
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    By the 1960s summit conferences had become an established medium of communication between national leaders. The Paris Peace Conference of 1919, attended by Lloyd-George, Clemenceau and Wilson, was the first major summit conference of the twentieth century, and during the Second World War the ‘Big Three’ conclaves between Roosevelt, Stalin and Churchill confirmed the growing institutionalisation of summitry as a means of managing international affairs. As well as by means of improvements in air travel, the process was further consolidated by Churchill’s calls in the early 1950s for a three power gathering to ease the tensions of the Cold War, and by then bilateral meetings between British and American leaders had become integral to the Anglo-American relationship. As well as material on numerous individual summits the general literature on summit diplomacy includes George Ball, Diplomacy for a Crowded World, Boston, Little, Brown, 1976Google Scholar
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© Board of the Journal of Transatlantic Studies 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Colman
    • 1
  1. 1.Liverpool Hope University CollegeUK

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