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Tertiary Education and Management

, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 245–261 | Cite as

The importance and degree of implementation of the European standards and guidelines for internal quality assurance in universities: the views of Portuguese academics

  • Maria J. Manatos
  • Maria J. Rosa
  • Cláudia S. SarricoEmail author
Article

Abstract

This research seeks to explore academics’ perceptions of the importance and degree of implementation of the Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance in the European Higher Education Area (ESG) for internal quality assurance. It uses empirical evidence from Portugal, gathered via a questionnaire given to all university academics. Results show academics’ perceptions of the importance and implementation of the ESG in their institutions to be quite positive. Nevertheless, academics tend to find the standards more important than effectively implemented. Furthermore, significant differences in perceptions emerge between groups of academics. This study intends to contribute to a better understanding of the implementation of quality management practices in universities, and the influence of the ESG in this process.

Keywords

quality management European standards and guidelines (ESG) Portugal importance implementation 

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Copyright information

© The European Higher Education Society 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.ISEG Lisbon School of Economics & ManagementUniversidade de LisboaLisboaPortugal
  2. 2.CIPES Centre for Research in Higher Education PoliciesPortoPortugal
  3. 3.DEGEI Department of Economics, Management and Industrial EngineeringUniversity of AveiroAveiroPortugal

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