Australasian Plant Pathology

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 425–426 | Cite as

First record of a phytoplasma-associated disease of chickpea (Cicer arietinum) in Australia

  • M. Saqib
  • K. L. Bayliss
  • B. Dell
  • G. E. StJ. Hardf
  • M. G. K. Jones
Disease Notes or New Records

Abstract

Chickpeas growing in the agricultural region of Kununurra, Western Australia, were found with symptoms of leaf stunting, little leaf and proliferating branches. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from symptomatic and asymptomatic plants and tested for phytoplasma by PCR. The PCR product from symptomatic leaves was sequenced and confirmed the presence of a phytoplasma with high similarity to the 16SrII group ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia’. This is the first molecular evidence for a phytoplasma-associated disease in chickpea.

Additional keywords

kabuli Candidatus Phytoplasma aurantifolia 

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Copyright information

© Australasian Plant Pathology Society 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Saqib
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. L. Bayliss
    • 2
  • B. Dell
    • 2
  • G. E. StJ. Hardf
    • 2
  • M. G. K. Jones
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.WA State Agricultural Biotechnology CentreMurdoch UniversityPerthAustralia
  2. 2.School of Biological Sciences and BiotechnologyMurdoch UniversityPerthAustralia

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