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Australasian Plant Pathology

, Volume 34, Issue 3, pp 397–399 | Cite as

Capsicum chlorosis virus infecting Capsicum annuum in the East Kimberley region of Western Australia

  • R. A. C. JonesEmail author
  • M. Sharmanc
Short Research Notes

Abstract

Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) was detected in field grown Capsicum annuum from Kununurra in north-east Western Australia. Identification of the Kununurra isolate (WA-99) was confirmed using sap transmission to indicator hosts, positive reactions with tospovirus serogroup IV-specific antibodies and CaCV-specific primers, and amino acid sequence comparisons that showed > 97% identity with published CaCV nucleocapsid gene sequences. The reactions of indicator hosts to infection with WA-99 often differed from those of the type isolate from Queensland. The virus multiplied best when test plants were grown at warm temperatures. CaCV was not detected in samples collected in a survey of C. annuum crops planted in the Perth Metropolitan area.

Additional keywords

tospovirus identification host range symptomatology sequence 

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References

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Copyright information

© Australasian Plant Pathology Society 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AgricultureBentley Delivery CentreBentleyAustralia
  2. 2.School of Biological Sciences and BiotechnologyMurdoch UniversityMurdochAustralia
  3. 3.Department of Primary Industries and FisheriesIndooroopillyAustralia

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