Advertisement

Australasian Plant Pathology

, Volume 37, Issue 2, pp 162–170 | Cite as

Response of Brassica napus and B. juncea germplasm from Australia, China and India to Australian populations of Leptosphaeria maculans

  • C. X. Li
  • N. Wratten
  • P. A. Salisbury
  • W. A. Burton
  • T. D. Potter
  • G. Walton
  • Hua Li
  • K. Sivasithamparam
  • Surinder S. Banga
  • Shashi Banga
  • D. Singh
  • S. Y. Liu
  • T. D. Fu
  • M. J. Barbetti
Article

Abstract

Germplasm from Australia, China and India was screened for resistance to blackleg (phoma stem canker), caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, under Australian field conditions. More than half of the world’s races of L. maculans occur in Australia, and sites were chosen to encompass areas of high race diversity. Plots were sown into the previous season’s L. maculans-infested residues. Significant differences in response were observed among genotypes of both Brassica napus and B. juncea when tested in Victoria, South Australia and Western Australia. Significant differences in response were observed among B. juncea, but not B. napus genotypes, when tested in New South Wales. Differences in the relative degree of expression of host resistance were observed between some test sites in relation to Australian cultivars that either contained major gene-based resistance (e.g. Surpass 400) or those that effectively had only polygenic resistance (e.g. AV-Sapphire, Lantern, Monty, Rainbow and Trigold). Australian genotypes, especially of B. napus, are generally more resistant than the Chinese and Indian genotypes. The majority of the B. juncea genotypes from both China (e.g. Xinyou 5) and India (e.g. Rohini) showed a high level of resistance, while some B. napus genotypes (e.g. 04-P34, P617 and P624 from China) showed at least a low level of resistance. Promising Australian B. napus germplasm in particular may provide high levels of polygenic resistance to both India and China should the disease become established in one or both those countries.

Keywords

Australasian Plant Pathology Plant Survival Susceptible Genotype Western Australia South Australia 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Anon. (2004) Blackleg resistance breakdown in canola varieties containing ‘sylvestris’ resistance. National Recommendations for 2004. Canola Association of Australia and Oilseeds Western Australia, Miscellaneous Bulletin. 2 pp.Google Scholar
  2. Balesdent MH, Barbetti MJ, Hua Li, Sivasithamparam K, Gout L, Rouxel T (2005) Analysis of Leptosphaeria maculans race structure in a worldwide collection of isolates. Phytopathology 95, 1061–1071. doi: 10.1094/ PHYTO-95-1061CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Ballinger DJ, Salisbury PA (1996) Seedling and adult plant evaluation of race variability in Leptosphaeria maculans on Brassica species in Australia. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture 36, 485–488. doi: 10.1071/EA9960485CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Barbetti MJ (1975) Effects of temperature on development and progression in rape of crown canker caused by Leptosphaeria maculans. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture and Animal Husbandry 15, 705–708. doi: 10.1071/EA9750705CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Fitt BDL, Brun H, Barbetti MJ, Rimmer SR (2006) World-wide importance of phomastem canker (Leptosphaeria maculans and L. biglobosa) on oilseed rape (Brassica napus). European Journal of Plant Pathology 114, 3–15. doi: 10.1007/s10658-005-2233-5CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Fitt BDL, Hu BC, Li Z, Liu S, Lange RM, Kharbanda PD, White RP (2007) Strategies to prevent spread of Leptosphaeria maculans (phoma stem canker) onto oilseed rape crops in China. In ‘Proceedings of the 12th International Rapeseed Congress, Wuhan, China. Vol. IV’. (Eds T Fu, C Guan) pp. 28–31. (Science Press USA Inc.: Monmouth Junction, NJ)Google Scholar
  7. Gororo N, Salisbury P, Marcroft S (2004) Dunkeld and Rainbow: a tale of two Victorian canola cultivars. In ‘Proceedings of the 4th International Crop Science Congress, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia’. Available at http://www.regional.org.au/au/cs/2004/poster/3/7/3/975_gororo.htm [Verified 14 January 2008]Google Scholar
  8. Gugel RK, Petrie GA (1992) History, occurrence, impact and control of blackleg of rapeseed. Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology 14, 36–45.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Hua Li, Barbetti MJ, Sivasithamparam K (2003) Responses of Brassica napus cultivars to Leptosphaeria maculans field isolates from Western Australia. Brassica 5, 25–34.Google Scholar
  10. Hua Li, Damour L, Barbetti MJ, Sivasithamparam K (2004) Increased virulence and physiological specialization among Western Australian isolates of Leptosphaeria maculans breaking down existing single dominant gene-based resistance in six cultivars of Brassica napus. Brassica 6, 9–16.Google Scholar
  11. Hua Li, Barbetti MJ, Sivasithamparam K (2005) Hazard from reliance on cruciferous hosts as sources of major gene-based resistance for managing blackleg (Leptosphaeria maculans) disease. Field Crops Research 91, 185–198. doi: 10.1016/j.fcr.2004.06.006CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Hua Li, Smyth F, Barbetti MJ, Sivasithamparam K (2006) Relationship in Brassica napus seedling and adult plant responses to Leptosphaeria maculans is determined by plant growth stage at inoculation and temperature regime. Field Crops Research 96, 428–437. doi: 10.1016/j.fcr.2005.08.006CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Li H, Sivasithamparam K, Barbetti MJ (2003) Breakdown of a Brassica rapa subsp. sylvestris single dominant blackleg resistance gene in B. napus rapeseed by field isolates in Australia. Plant Disease 87, 752. doi: 10.1094/PDIS.2003.87.6.752ACrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Rouxel T, Willner E, Coudard L, Balesdent MH (2003) Screening and identification of resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans (stem canker) in Brassica napus accessions. Euphytica 133, 219–231. doi: 10.1023/A:1025597622490CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Salisbury PA, Ballinger DJ, Wratten N, Plummer KM, Howlett BJ (1995) Blackleg disease on oilseed Brassica in Australia: a review. Australian Journal of Experimental Agriculture 35, 665–672. doi: 10.1071/EA9950665CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Sivasithamparam K, Barbetti MJ, Hua Li (2005) Recurring challenges from a necrotrophic fungal plant pathogen: a case study with Leptosphaeria maculans (causal agent of blackleg disease in Brassicas) in Western Australia. Annals of Botany 96, 363–377. doi: 10.1093/aob/mci194CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Sosnowski MR, Scott ES, Ramsey MD (2001) Pathogenic variation of South Australian isolates of Leptosphaeria maculans and interactions with cultivars of canola (Brassica napus). Australasian Plant Pathology 30, 45–51. doi: 10.1071/AP00064CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Sosnowski MR, Scott ES, Ramsey MD (2004) Infection of Australian canola cultivars (Brassica napus) by Leptosphaeria maculans is influenced by cultivar and environmental conditions. Australasian Plant Pathology 33, 401–411. doi: 10.1071/AP04045CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Thomas V, Salisbury P, Norton R, Marcroft S (2007) The current situation in the Brassica juncea—Leptosphaeria maculans pathosystem and how future changes will be monitored. In ‘Proceedings of the 12th International Rapeseed Congress, Wuhan, China. Vol. IV’. (Eds T Fu, C Guan) pp. 213–216. (Science Press USA Inc.: Monmouth Junction, NJ)Google Scholar
  20. West JS, Evans N, Liu S, Hu B, Peng L (2000) Leptosphaeria maculans causing stem canker of oilseed rape in China. Plant Pathology 49, 800. doi: 10.1046/j.1365-3059.2000.00503.xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. West JS, Kharbanda PD, Barbetti MJ, Fitt BDL (2001) Epidemiology and management of Leptosphaeria maculans (phoma stem canker) on oilseed rape in Australia, Canada and Europe. Plant Pathology 50, 10–27. doi: 10.1046/j.1365-3059.2001.00546.xCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Australasian Plant Pathology Society 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. X. Li
    • 1
  • N. Wratten
    • 2
  • P. A. Salisbury
    • 3
  • W. A. Burton
    • 4
  • T. D. Potter
    • 5
  • G. Walton
    • 6
  • Hua Li
    • 7
  • K. Sivasithamparam
    • 7
  • Surinder S. Banga
    • 8
  • Shashi Banga
    • 8
  • D. Singh
    • 9
  • S. Y. Liu
    • 10
  • T. D. Fu
    • 11
  • M. J. Barbetti
    • 1
    • 6
  1. 1.School of Plant Biology, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural SciencesThe University of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia
  2. 2.New South Wales Department of Primary IndustriesWagga WaggaAustralia
  3. 3.School of Agriculture and Food SystemsThe University of MelbourneAustralia
  4. 4.Primary Industries Research VictoriaHorshamAustralia
  5. 5.South Australian Research and Development InstituteNaracoorteAustralia
  6. 6.Department of Agriculture and Food Western AustraliaSouth PerthAustralia
  7. 7.Earth and Geographical Sciences, Faculty of Natural and Agricultural SciencesThe University of Western AustraliaCrawleyAustralia
  8. 8.Department of Plant Breeding, Genetics and BiotechnologyPunjab Agricultural UniversityLudhianaIndia
  9. 9.Oilseeds SectionC. C. S. Haryana Agricultural UniversityHisarIndia
  10. 10.Institute of Oil Crops ResearchChinese Academy of Agricultural SciencesWuhanPeople’s Republicof China
  11. 11.The National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetics and ImprovementHuazhong Agricultural UniversityWuhanPeople’s Republic of China

Personalised recommendations