Australasian Plant Pathology

, Volume 33, Issue 3, pp 379–384 | Cite as

Evaluation of mineral oils and plant-derived spray adjuvants, mancozeb formulations and rates of application, for the control of yellow Sigatoka leaf spot (caused by Mycosphaerella musicola) of bananas in far northern Queensland, Australia

  • L. L. Vawdrey
  • R. A. Peterson
  • L. DeMarchi
  • K. E. Grice
Article

Abstract

Five mineral oils, four plant oils, and a plant-derived non-ionic sticker/adjuvant were evaluated for the control of yellow Sigatoka of banana in a field experiment in far northern Queensland, Australia. Treatments were compared with the industry standards BP Miscible Banana Misting Oil and Fuchs Spray Oil used at the recommended rate of 4075 g a.i./ha. The plant-derived products were less effective (P < 0.05) at controlling yellow Sigatoka than either industry standard mineral oil. All the mineral oil treatments gave more effective disease control (P < 0.05) than any of the plant-derived treatments. Increasing rates of application of BP Miscible Banana Misting Oil (2853, 4075, 6520 or 8150 g a.i./ha) resulted in an increase in the control of yellow Sigatoka. In a second field experiment, 13 treatments consisting of four formulations of mancozeb used at varying rates of application were evaluated. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) between mancozeb formulations. Disease assessments conducted 2 weeks prior to harvest showed that mancozeb as Dithane DF at 1000 g a.i./ha was less effective than Dithane DF at 1760, 2000 or 2500 g a.i./ha in controlling yellow Sigatoka.

Additional keywords

canola oil dithiocarbamates Giant Cavendish paraffinic oils petroleum oils tea tree oil 

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Copyright information

© Australasian Plant Pathology Society 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. L. Vawdrey
    • 1
  • R. A. Peterson
    • 2
  • L. DeMarchi
    • 1
  • K. E. Grice
    • 2
  1. 1.Agency for Food and Fibre Sciences — Horticulture, Department of Primary IndustriesCentre for Wet Tropics AgricultureSouth JohnstoneAustralia
  2. 2.Agency for Food and Fibre Sciences — Horticulture, Department of Primary IndustriesCentre for Tropical AgricultureMareebaAustralia

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